Profile Category: Ministries & Coordinators

Home / Ministries & Coordinators
Elmer Noronha
Profiles

Elmer Noronha

Facilitating worship of the Community by coordinating and providing quality liturgical experiences which celebrate and strengthen the Community’s journey of faith and help parishioners nurture a love and devotion to their Catholic faith. Responsible for Diocesan and Parish mission, vision and culture. Cultivate leaders and teams in their personal journey of discipleship and in service to the Community.

Rodney Kwenge
Profiles

Rodney Kwenge

The Alter Servers Ministry is a group of young servers that assist the Parish/Community with Liturgical and Religious Celebrations. It's main goal is to encourage young men and women to become worthy guards of honour to the Eucharistic King and rekindle greater piety and devotion to Christ through the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass.
The Altar Server is an important part of the Celebration of the Mass and assists the priest and deacon throughout the Celebration of the Mass and other Liturgical celebrations. 
The Ministry is not for the ordained (the priest & deacons) but a call to all members of the
church/Community received through our Baptism.
Who is qualified to become an altar server?
One must have already received the Sacrament of the First Holy Communion.

Priscilla Goes
Profiles

Priscilla Goes

The Coordinators' Ministry plays a vital role in the celebration of Mass, as it comprises of very dedicated individuals who work tirelessly behind the scenes to orchestrate and streamline various events before, during and after the celebration of Mass. The Ministry's commitment and collaborative efforts make it a cornerstone in the successful functioning of Mass, demonstrating the significance of collective dedication in creating vibrant and well-coordinated experiences for the community.
Any willing member of the community is eligible to join the Coordinators' Ministry.

Woki Muhindi
Profiles

Woki Muhindi

The Holy Father Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI affirmed that the presentation of the gifts at the offertory ought “not to be viewed simply as a kind of ‘interval’ between the liturgy of the word and the liturgy of the Eucharist… It enables us to appreciate how God invites man to participate in bringing to fulfilment his handiwork, and in so doing, gives human labour its authentic meaning, since through the celebration of the Eucharist, it is united to the redemptive sacrifice of Christ” (Sacramentum Caritatis, §47). This custom is inspired by the example of Christ who became poor to make us rich [Cf. 1 Cor 16:1; 2 Cor 8:9].

  • 1
  • 2